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Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you.

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities.

Local Contact lens supplier near you in Phoenix, Arizona

Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved.

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else.

Advanced EyeCare Center Eye Clinic and Eye exam, contact lenses, myopia in Phoenix, Arizona

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Phoenix eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

At Advanced EyeCare Center, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today.

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

Local Eye exam, contact lenses, myopia in Phoenix, Arizona

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A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications.

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health.

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Advanced EyeCare Center in Phoenix today.

Call Advanced EyeCare Center on 623-552-2155 to schedule an eye exam with our Phoenix optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Women and Diabetes – World Diabetes Day

Guidelines For Picking the Right Pair of Shades

Why You Regularly Need to Replace Your Sunglasses

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses 

5 Reasons To Wear Sunglasses In The Fall

When we think of fall accessories, the first things that come to mind are warm sweaters, plush scarves, or a snug pair of boots. Here’s another essential item to add to your list: a good quality pair of UV-blocking sunglasses.

But why is it so important to protect your eyes when the sun seems to be hiding behind clouds on most days? While it may not make much sense, you’ll get a better understanding by the time you finish reading this article. So let’s dive in and explore the 5 reasons you should protect your eyes from the sun in the fall.

Local Contact lens supplier near you in Phoenix, Arizona

Sunglasses: Summer Vs. Fall

The Sun’s Position

While we may squint more in the summer, the sunlight’s path to the eyes is more direct in the fall as the sun sits closer to the horizon. This places our eyes at greater risk of overexposure to UV rays.

Changing Temperatures

Irritating symptoms like dry, red, or watery eyes are often due to the season’s cool and harsh winds. The colder the air, the stiffer and thicker the eyes’ tear oils (meibum) become. Because thicker meibum doesn’t spread as evenly over the surface of the eyes, the tears can’t offer sufficient protection and moisture.

Minimize irritation by shielding the eyes from cool winds with wraparound sunglasses.

Advanced EyeCare Center Eye Clinic and Sunglasses, Eye Protection and Fall Fashion in Phoenix, Arizona

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Phoenix eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

UV Rays

Exposing your eyes to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays is problematic year-round, as it can result in serious eye diseases, such as cataracts and macular degeneration. That’s why it’s important to wear 100% UV-blocking sunglasses anytime you’re outdoors, no matter the season.

Make sure to sport your sunnies even on cloudy days, as up to 90% of UV rays pass through clouds. Furthermore, outdoor objects like concrete and snow reflect a significant amount of UV rays into the eyes.

Fall’s Dangerous Sun Glare

Because the sun is positioned at a lower angle in the fall, it can produce a brutal glare that poses a danger for driving. Rays of light that reflect off of smooth surfaces like the metal of nearby cars can be so bright to the point of blinding the driver.

You can combat this dangerous glare by wearing polarized sunglasses. These lenses reduce the glare’s harmful effects by filtering out horizontal light waves, such as the ones reflected by a shiny car bumper.

Local Sunglasses, Eye Protection and Fall Fashion in Phoenix, Arizona

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Looking for Sunglasses Near You?

Here’s the bottom line: you need to protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses in the fall and year-round, no matter the season or climate. Investing in a stylish pair of durable, UV-protective sunglasses is — simply-put — a worthwhile investment in your eye health.

So if you’re looking for advice about a new pair of high-quality sunglasses for the fall, with or without prescription lenses, visit Advanced EyeCare Center. If standard sunglass lenses are too dark for you at this time of year, ask us about green or brown tinted lenses; they transmit more light and contrast to the eyes than standard grey tints.

We’ll be happy to help you find that perfect pair to protect your eyes, suit your lifestyle needs and enhance your personal style. To learn more, call 623-552-2155 to contact our Phoenix eye doctor today.

Call Advanced EyeCare Center on 623-552-2155 to schedule an eye exam with our Phoenix optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


Just in case you missed them, here are some of our previous blog posts :

Smart Hygiene Habits to Care for Your Contact Lenses

6 Tips for Having Healthy Eyes & Contact Lenses

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses 

Keeping an Eye on Cataracts

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Advanced EyeCare CenterHelping to Prevent Eye Strain in the Virtual Classroom

The COVID pandemic has upended and disrupted lives in ways we could not have imagined. While most adults work from home, children and young adults continue to attend school—albeit virtually. Between smartphones, tablets and computers, your kids are likely spending 6 to 10 hours a day looking at screens.

Learning on Tech Devices for 6 hours

5 TOP TIPS

Remote learning may cause eye strain, characterized by headaches, blurry vision, dry or itchy eyes, and even double vision. Make sure your child is practicing good eye care now in order to prevent any long-term eye damage.

number 1

Reposition the monitor.


Computer screens should be situated 20-30 inches away from the eyes and no more than 4-5 inches below eye level. Make sure to position the computer so that the top is just below eye level.

sit with good posture on supportive chair 28-55 cm high, elbows at right-angle resting on desk, desk 72-75 cm high, computer monitor at eye level 40-57 cm away angled 20 degrees up toward face, foot rest

number 2

Rest the eyes.

For every 2 hours spent staring at a screen, have your kid rest their eyes for 15 minutes by doing something else. The 20-20-20 rule is also very effective; every 20 minutes, have your child look away from the screen for 20 seconds and gaze at an object situated 20 feet away. To help them remember, set up an alarm.

number 3

Zoom in.

If the text on the screen is too small, encourage your child to zoom in for comfortable reading. This can prevent potential eye strain and headaches commonly associated with online reading.

number 4

Take breaks.


Make sure your child takes breaks as needed. Regardless of the day’s schedule, it’s critical to fit in a break once using the computer begins to feel uncomfortable. Breaks can include stretches, playing a musical instrument, eating a snack or going for a bike ride outside.

number 5

Reduce computer glare.

To reduce glare and to make it more comfortable on the eyes, ensure the lighting in the room is dimmer than the computer screen. You can also reduce glare by placing the screen away from the window or by using drapes/blinds.

Happy Learning!

COVID-19 Update

Dated: May 4, 2020

Dear Patients,

We are happy to announce that our office has re-opened for routine eye care as well as urgent and emergency care. We have also returned to our regular days and hours:

Monday - Thursday: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm & 2:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Please note:

Our primary goal during the COVID-19 crisis is to ensure a safe environment for our patients and staff. We are sure that you are well aware of the concerns about COVID-19 and we wanted to take this opportunity to let you know the safety measures we are taking. These measures include but are not limited to:

Steps We Will Take:

  • All of our staff and doctors will be wearing appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including gloves, masks and face-shields
  • Each pre-testing and examination rooms are disinfected after every patient exam, including all surfaces, instrumentation, door handles, and equipment.
  • We will be aware of common “touch points” within the clinic such as doorknobs, counters, keyboard, phones, credit card machines, pens, etc… and will be disinfecting these as often as possible.
  • Appointment times will be spaced further apart to ensure social distancing. Limiting the number of patients in the office or any area at one time.
  • All frames will be disinfected after contact with any patient.

Steps We Ask Our Patients to Take:

  • Your temperature will be taken before entering the office.
  • All patients will sanitize their hands upon entering the office.
  • All patients must complete a COVID-19 questionnaire upon arrival at the practice.
  • All patients must wear a face mask. If you do not have one, one will be provided for you.
  • We ask that you arrive at your appointment alone unless you are accompanying someone who requires adult supervision

For a comprehensive list of the all of the COVID-19 precautions we are taking, click here.

IMG 6084 (600 x 450)    IMG 6075 (600 x 450)

 

 

COVID-19 Update to our Patients

Dated: April 1, 2020

Dear Valued Patient,

At Advanced Eye Care Center, the health and safety of our patients and staff is our top concern.

Effective on April 6, and until further notice:

  • Our office will be closed for routine eye exams, due to CDC recommendations.

  • We are open, by appointment only, for:

    • post-op patient appointments

    • contact lens checks

    • eyeglasses and contacts pick-ups

    • eyeglasses adjustments

  • We will only be open on Tuesdays and Thursdays:

    • Tuesdays: 8 am – 1 pm (eyeglasses and contacts pick-up from 8 am to 12 pm)

    • Thursdays: 1pm – 5pm (eyeglasses and contacts pick-up from 8am to 12pm

  • To re-order contact lenses, either call us at the number below, email us at info@aeccenteraz.com, or fill out this online form.

Feel free to contact us with any questions at 623-552-2155. Thank you.

The Advanced Eye Care Center Team

Coronavirus and Your Eyes – What You Should Know

As coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads around the world, health professionals are demanding that people limit their personal risk of contracting the virus by thoroughly washing their hands, practicing social distancing, and not touching their nose, mouth, or eyes. In fact, it may surprise you to learn that the eyes play an important role in spreading COVID-19.

Coronavirus is transmitted from person to person through droplets that an infected person sneezes or coughs out. These droplets can easily enter your body through the mucous membranes on the face, such as your nose, mouth, and yes — your eyes.

But First, What Is Coronavirus?

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, causes mild to severe respiratory illness associated with fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. Symptoms typically appear within 2 weeks of exposure. Those with acute cases of the virus can develop pneumonia and other life-threatening complications.

Here’s what you should know:

Guard Your Eyes Against COVID-19

  • Avoid rubbing your eyes. Although we all engage in this very normal habit, try to fight the urge to touch your eyes. If you absolutely must, first wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Tears carry the virus. Touching tears or a surface where tears have fallen can spread coronavirus. Make sure to wash your hands after touching your eyes and throughout the day as well.
  • Disinfect surfaces. You can catch COVID-19 by touching an object or surface that has the virus on it, such as a door knob, and then touching your eyes.

Coronavirus and Pink Eye

Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, refers to an inflammation of the membrane covering the front of the eyeball. Conjunctivitis is characterized by red, watery, and itchy eyes. Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can be spread by coughing and sneezing, too.

According to a recent study in China, viral conjunctivitis may be a symptom of COVID-19. The study found conjunctival congestion in 9 of the 1,099 patients (0.8%) who were confirmed to have coronavirus.

If you suspect you have pink eye, call your eye doctor in Phoenix right away. Given the current coronavirus crisis, we ask patients to call prior to presenting themselves at the office of Dr. George Johnson, as it will allow the staff to assess your condition and adequately prepare for your visit.

Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

Many people who wear contact lenses are thinking about switching to eyeglasses for the time being to lower the threat of being infected with coronavirus.

Wearing glasses may provide an extra layer of protection if someone coughs on you; hopefully that infected droplet will hit the lens and not your eye. However, one must still be cautious, as the virus can reach the eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms around your frames. Unlike specialized safety goggles, glasses are not considered a safe way to prevent coronavirus.

Contact Lenses and COVID-19

If you wear contacts, make sure to properly wash your hands prior to removing or inserting them. Consider ordering a 3 to 6 month supply of contact lenses and solution; some opticals provide home delivery of contact lenses and solutions. At this stage there is no recommendation to wear daily lenses over monthlies.

Don’t switch your contact lens brand or solution, unless approved by your optometrist or optician.

Regularly Disinfect Glasses

Some viruses such as coronavirus, can remain on hard surfaces from several hours to days. This can then be transmitted to the wearer’s fingers and face. People who wear reading glasses for presbyopia should be even more careful, because they usually need to handle their glasses more often throughout the day, and older individuals tend to be more vulnerable to COVID-19 complications. Gently wash the lenses and frames with warm water and soap, and dry your eyeglasses using a microfiber cloth.

Stock up on Eye Medicine

It’s a good idea to stock up on important medications, including eye meds, in order to get by in case you need to be quarantined or if supplies run short. This may not be possible for everyone due to insurance limitations. If you cannot stock up, make sure to request a refill as soon as you’re due and never wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy.

It is important that you continue to follow your doctor’s instructions for all medications.

Digital Devices and Eyestrain

At times like this, people tend to use digital devices more than usual. Take note of tiredness, sore eyes, blurry vision, double vision or headaches, which are symptoms of computer vision syndrome if they are exacerbated by extensive use of digital devices, and might indicate a need for a new prescription in the near future. This usually isn’t urgent, but if you’re unsure, you can call our eye doctor’s office.

Children and Digital Devices

During this time your children may end up watching TV and using computers, tablets and smartphones more frequently and for more extended periods too. Computer vision syndrome, mentioned above, can affect children as well. We recommend limiting screen time to a maximum of 2 hours per day for children, though it’s understandably difficult to control under the circumstances.

Try to get your child to take a 10 to 15 minute break every hour, and stop all screen time for at least 60 minutes before sleep.

Children and Outdoor Play

Please follow local guidelines and instructions regarding outdoor activities for your children. If possible, it’s actually good for visual development to spend 1-2 hours a day outside.

 

From all of us at Advanced EyeCare Center in Phoenix, we wish you good health and please stay safe.

3 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Vision and Eyes

Did you know that people with diabetes are 20 times more likely to get eye diseases than those without it? There are three major eye conditions that diabetics are at risk for developing: cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. To prevent these sight-threatening diseases, it’s important to control your blood sugar level and have your eyes checked at least once a year by an eye doctor.

But First, What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that is associated with high blood glucose levels. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps our cells get energy from the sugars we eat. Diabetes develops when the body doesn’t produce or respond to insulin effectively, leaving too much sugar in the blood stream instead. Over time, diabetes can lead to potentially irreversible ocular damage and poor eyesight. However, by taking care of your blood sugar levels and your eyes, you can prevent vision loss.

Annual eye exams are recommended for everyone, but routine screenings are even more important for diabetics. Eye doctors may send diabetic eye health reports to a patient’s primary care physician or internist to adjust medication as needed to prevent complications.

What’s the Link Between Vision and Diabetes?

Blurred vision or fluctuating eyesight clarity is often one of the first noticeable signs that diabetes has begun to affect your eyes. Sometimes, fluid leaking into the eye causes the lens to swell and change shape. This, in turn, makes it difficult for the eyes to focus, resulting in fuzzy vision. Such symptoms can indicate that an eye disease is developing, or may simply be due to imbalanced blood sugar levels which can be rectified by getting your blood sugar back to healthy levels.

If you start to notice blurry vision, make an appointment with Dr. George Johnson as soon as possible.

The 3 Ways Diabetes Impacts Vision

Cataracts

While cataracts are extremely common and a part of the natural aging process, those with diabetes tend to develop cataracts earlier in life. Characterized by a clouding or fogging of the lens within the eye, cataracts impede light from entering the eye, causing blurred vision and glares. The best treatment is cataract surgery, which is very safe and effective.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma refers to a group of eye diseases characterized by optic nerve damage. Since it tends to impact peripheral vision first, glaucoma often goes unnoticed until significant damage has occurred. However, routine glaucoma screenings can detect warning signs; early treatment can prevent disease progression and vision loss.

Although there is no true cure for glaucoma, most glaucoma patients successfully manage it with special eye drops, medication, and on occasion, laser treatment or other surgery. The earlier glaucoma is diagnosed and managed, the better the outcome.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy occurs when the small blood vessels on your retina (capillaries) become weakened and then balloon (microaneurysm) due to poorly controlled blood sugar levels. The resulting poor blood circulation in the back of the eye causes more abnormal blood vessels to grow, which also bleed or leak fluid, and can lead to scar tissue, retinal detachment and even blindness, over time.

Often there are no symptoms until the advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, where patients may begin to see spots and missing patches in their vision. Retinopathy can be treated through surgery and eye injections, but the best way to prevent this disease from progressing is to regularly have your eyes screened.

The good news is that diabetic eye disease can often be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and regular diabetic eye exams. Contact Advanced EyeCare Center in Phoenix to set up your eye doctor’s appointment today.

Featuring Ellen Tracy Frames

IMG 8581

Miss Crystal is ecstatic about her new Ellen Tracy glasses!

Drop by and try on a pair for yourself, or browse through our extensive line of Designer Frames to find the right pair for you. Call to schedule an appointment.

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